THE IDIOT

Opera, Music and Cinema appreciation.

The unbelievable 1904 recording of Enrico Caruso singing ‘Una Furtiva Lagrima’ from Donizetti’s L’elisir d’amore

brahmsismyhomeboy:

can someone please write an opera where the main character canonically cannot sing?

moses from moses und aron you uncultured plebeians

(via devilishlyoperatic)

signorcasaubon:

mediterraneum:

Iraq: Two young Christian women pose on a Mosul street in 1927.

One of the oldest Christian communities in the world is being herded into slaughter— and nary a peep from the West.

signorcasaubon:

mediterraneum:

Iraq: Two young Christian women pose on a Mosul street in 1927.

One of the oldest Christian communities in the world is being herded into slaughter— and nary a peep from the West.

(via theraccolta)

theraccolta:

Saint Apollinaris amid Sheep, Byzantine mosaic in the apse of the basilica of Sant’Apollinare in Classe (Ravenna, Italy0

theraccolta:

Saint Apollinaris amid Sheep, Byzantine mosaic in the apse of the basilica of Sant’Apollinare in Classe (Ravenna, Italy0

(Source: museumsyndicate.com)

Cara Sposa - sung by Delphine Galou

'I came out to have a good time and i'm honestly feeling so attacked right now' 
 - Brunhilde, Act I of Gotterdammerung

nuggetsandsnickers:

why are we still obsessing over things like twerking when this exists.

I’m dead

homilius:

visualizingmath:

Harmonices Mundi (Harmony of the World) by Johannes Kepler, 1619
In Harmonices Mundi (1619) Kepler attempted to explain the harmony of the world and contained what is known today as his third law. The work was founded on geometry, from which Kepler derived first a theory of musical harmony and then a cosmology of the heavens and the earth. Kepler attempted to find common rules between music and movement in the solar system. His music of the spheres is based on the relative maximum and minimum angular velocities of the planet measured from the sun. Using his theories, Kepler allotted to the planets musical intervals and musical motion.
“The Earth sings Mi, Fa, Mi: you may infer even from the syllables that in this our home misery and famine hold sway" -Kepler.
Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his laws of planetary motion based on his works Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. These works also provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton’s theory of universal gravitation.
Prints of Harmonices Mundi are available here. Does anyone know what “Hiclocum haber eriam” means?

Answer to the question: It’s hic locum habet etiam (This [celestial body] always holds this place). It’s the moon.

homilius:

visualizingmath:

Harmonices Mundi (Harmony of the World) by Johannes Kepler, 1619

In Harmonices Mundi (1619) Kepler attempted to explain the harmony of the world and contained what is known today as his third law. The work was founded on geometry, from which Kepler derived first a theory of musical harmony and then a cosmology of the heavens and the earth. Kepler attempted to find common rules between music and movement in the solar system. His music of the spheres is based on the relative maximum and minimum angular velocities of the planet measured from the sun. Using his theories, Kepler allotted to the planets musical intervals and musical motion.

The Earth sings Mi, Fa, Mi: you may infer even from the syllables that in this our home misery and famine hold sway" -Kepler.

Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his laws of planetary motion based on his works Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. These works also provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton’s theory of universal gravitation.

Prints of Harmonices Mundi are available here. Does anyone know what “Hiclocum haber eriam” means?

Answer to the question: It’s hic locum habet etiam (This [celestial body] always holds this place). It’s the moon.

(via devilishlyoperatic)

theraccolta:

Jörg Ratgeb - Scenes from the Life of the Prophet Elias

leadingtone:

Hokusai (c. 1760 - 1849), Japanese artist/printmaker.

The young have exalted notions, because they have not been humbled by life nor have they yet learned its necessary limitations. … They would always rather do noble deeds than useful ones; their lives are more regulated by moral feeling than by reason. All their mistakes are in the direction of excess and vehemence. They overdo everything.
—Aristotle, Rhetoric

leadingtone:

Hokusai (c. 1760 - 1849), Japanese artist/printmaker.

The young have exalted notions, because they have not been humbled by life nor have they yet learned its necessary limitations. … They would always rather do noble deeds than useful ones; their lives are more regulated by moral feeling than by reason. All their mistakes are in the direction of excess and vehemence. They overdo everything.

—Aristotle, Rhetoric